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skunkbear:

Math Is Pretty

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates 3D fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

satans-advocate:

sext: i want to pay bills and share household duties and approach our late 20’s in a financially and emotionally stable way with you

(via vikkitikkitavi)

telapathetic:

this show never fails me

(Source: monicapotters, via vikkitikkitavi)

mathmajik:

Fascinated by the intricate patterns formed by fractals, basically math processes that repeat incessantly in an ongoing feedback loop, UK physicist-turned-web developer Tom Beddard makes impossibly elaborate complexes that look like they belong in the gritty cities of a dystopian fantasy. Basically what he does is write and run programs on his computer that spit out patterns—”the best outcomes are often the least expected!” he writes—that he in turn massages (by way of shadowing and the like) into looking like faceted steel-and-concrete architecture.
Sources:
Curbed.com
Architizer.com

braceletnumbertwo:

look at these abbreviations my physics teacher writes on people’s quizzes im dyin

(via wyldboyz)

nevver:

Hyper-realistic Origami, Ariel DeAndrea

(Source: arieldeandrea.com)

nevver:

The best place to be is somewhere else, circa 1983

hyrodium:

How to draw an inverse of a.

1. Draw a unit circle.

2. Draw a straight line from the point (a, 0) to the North Pole (0, 1). This is line A.

3. Mark the point of intersection between the circle and line A.

4. Draw a straight line from the point of intersection to the South Pole (0, -1). This is line B.

5. Mark the point of intersection between line B and x-axis. This point is (1/a, 0).

The reason is homothetic triangles.

(via trigonometry-is-my-bitch)

matthen:

Here a line of fixed length is moved along the edge of an ellipse, tracing out a collection of new shapes. Consider the area of the shape traced by a point p units from one end of the line and q from the other. Holditch’s theorem, regarded as a milestone in the history of maths, tells us this area is less than the area of the ellipse by at least π×p×q. Curiously, this formula holds not just for an ellipse, but any closed curve. [more] [code]

matthen:

Here a line of fixed length is moved along the edge of an ellipse, tracing out a collection of new shapes. Consider the area of the shape traced by a point p units from one end of the line and q from the other. Holditch’s theorem, regarded as a milestone in the history of maths, tells us this area is less than the area of the ellipse by at least π×p×q. Curiously, this formula holds not just for an ellipse, but any closed curve. [more] [code]

(via trigonometry-is-my-bitch)

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:


6twenty6:

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

A Computed Tomography scan of the human body from head to toe

Male human body

….How observant

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

6twenty6:

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

A Computed Tomography scan of the human body from head to toe

Male human body

….How observant

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

 An Isochrone curve is the curve for which the time taken by an object sliding without friction in uniform gravity to its lowest point is independent of its starting point. The curve is a cycloid, and the time is equal to π times the square root of the radius over the acceleration of gravity.
- A ball set on an Isocrone (or Tautochrone) curve will reach the bottom at the same length of time no matter where you place the ball, so long as there is no impeding friction.
[Gif] - Four balls slide down a cycloid curve from different positions, but they arrive at the bottom at the same time. The blue arrows show the points’ acceleration along the curve. On the top is the time-position diagram.
[source]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

 An Isochrone curve is the curve for which the time taken by an object sliding without friction in uniform gravity to its lowest point is independent of its starting point. The curve is a cycloid, and the time is equal to π times the square root of the radius over the acceleration of gravity.

- A ball set on an Isocrone (or Tautochrone) curve will reach the bottom at the same length of time no matter where you place the ball, so long as there is no impeding friction.

[Gif] - Four balls slide down a cycloid curve from different positions, but they arrive at the bottom at the same time. The blue arrows show the points’ acceleration along the curve. On the top is the time-position diagram.

[source]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Mathematics in nature - A Snowflake exhibits its natural fractal pattern as well as its Geometrical uniformity.
[more fractal patterns]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Mathematics in nature - A Snowflake exhibits its natural fractal pattern as well as its Geometrical uniformity.

[more fractal patterns]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

The Wankel engine cycle (or Rotary engine)

skunkbear:

Math Is Pretty

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates 3D fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

satans-advocate:

sext: i want to pay bills and share household duties and approach our late 20’s in a financially and emotionally stable way with you

(via vikkitikkitavi)

telapathetic:

this show never fails me

(Source: monicapotters, via vikkitikkitavi)

mathmajik:

Fascinated by the intricate patterns formed by fractals, basically math processes that repeat incessantly in an ongoing feedback loop, UK physicist-turned-web developer Tom Beddard makes impossibly elaborate complexes that look like they belong in the gritty cities of a dystopian fantasy. Basically what he does is write and run programs on his computer that spit out patterns—”the best outcomes are often the least expected!” he writes—that he in turn massages (by way of shadowing and the like) into looking like faceted steel-and-concrete architecture.
Sources:
Curbed.com
Architizer.com

braceletnumbertwo:

look at these abbreviations my physics teacher writes on people’s quizzes im dyin

(via wyldboyz)

nevver:

Hyper-realistic Origami, Ariel DeAndrea

(Source: arieldeandrea.com)

nevver:

The best place to be is somewhere else, circa 1983

hyrodium:

How to draw an inverse of a.

1. Draw a unit circle.

2. Draw a straight line from the point (a, 0) to the North Pole (0, 1). This is line A.

3. Mark the point of intersection between the circle and line A.

4. Draw a straight line from the point of intersection to the South Pole (0, -1). This is line B.

5. Mark the point of intersection between line B and x-axis. This point is (1/a, 0).

The reason is homothetic triangles.

(via trigonometry-is-my-bitch)

matthen:

Here a line of fixed length is moved along the edge of an ellipse, tracing out a collection of new shapes. Consider the area of the shape traced by a point p units from one end of the line and q from the other. Holditch’s theorem, regarded as a milestone in the history of maths, tells us this area is less than the area of the ellipse by at least π×p×q. Curiously, this formula holds not just for an ellipse, but any closed curve. [more] [code]

matthen:

Here a line of fixed length is moved along the edge of an ellipse, tracing out a collection of new shapes. Consider the area of the shape traced by a point p units from one end of the line and q from the other. Holditch’s theorem, regarded as a milestone in the history of maths, tells us this area is less than the area of the ellipse by at least π×p×q. Curiously, this formula holds not just for an ellipse, but any closed curve. [more] [code]

(via trigonometry-is-my-bitch)

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:


6twenty6:

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

A Computed Tomography scan of the human body from head to toe

Male human body

….How observant

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

6twenty6:

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

A Computed Tomography scan of the human body from head to toe

Male human body

….How observant

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

 An Isochrone curve is the curve for which the time taken by an object sliding without friction in uniform gravity to its lowest point is independent of its starting point. The curve is a cycloid, and the time is equal to π times the square root of the radius over the acceleration of gravity.
- A ball set on an Isocrone (or Tautochrone) curve will reach the bottom at the same length of time no matter where you place the ball, so long as there is no impeding friction.
[Gif] - Four balls slide down a cycloid curve from different positions, but they arrive at the bottom at the same time. The blue arrows show the points’ acceleration along the curve. On the top is the time-position diagram.
[source]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

 An Isochrone curve is the curve for which the time taken by an object sliding without friction in uniform gravity to its lowest point is independent of its starting point. The curve is a cycloid, and the time is equal to π times the square root of the radius over the acceleration of gravity.

- A ball set on an Isocrone (or Tautochrone) curve will reach the bottom at the same length of time no matter where you place the ball, so long as there is no impeding friction.

[Gif] - Four balls slide down a cycloid curve from different positions, but they arrive at the bottom at the same time. The blue arrows show the points’ acceleration along the curve. On the top is the time-position diagram.

[source]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Mathematics in nature - A Snowflake exhibits its natural fractal pattern as well as its Geometrical uniformity.
[more fractal patterns]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Mathematics in nature - A Snowflake exhibits its natural fractal pattern as well as its Geometrical uniformity.

[more fractal patterns]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

The Wankel engine cycle (or Rotary engine)

About:

Kenneth "gamechallenged" McLarney
Editing, Physics, Halo, Design, Music.

Following: